Easter · oranges · Our Lady of Sorrows · Plaza Civica · wheat grass

Friday of Sorrows and Popsicles

Holy week begins in San Miguel de Allende and all of Mexico on Friday one week before Good Friday with Viernes de Dolores (Friday of Sorrows) ceremonies.
If we have these types of events in the U.S. it did not reach my eyes or ears until SMA.
Early on Friday morning, flower vendors set up stalls throughout the city, and were busy all day as people prepared their homes for the late afternoon and evening visitors.
Preparations also began Friday morning In the Plaza Civica where a major altar was erected and highlighted with artistic designs carefully made with colored sawdust and flower petals.
Viernes de Dolores, Friday of Sorrows, Easter, altars, Virgin Mother Mary, Our Lady of Sorrows, oranges, wheat grass, popsicles, photo challenge , San Miguel de Allende, Mexico, Weekly Prompts Photo Challenge,
Viernes de Dolores, Friday of Sorrows, Easter, altars, Virgin Mother Mary, Our Lady of Sorrows, oranges, wheat grass, popsicles, photo challenge , San Miguel de Allende, Mexico, Weekly Prompts Photo Challenge,
In Mexico, altars are created in homes, doorways, along streets, and in public squares signifying the grief and sorrow the Virgin Mother Mary will have of her son’s upcoming death.
Viernes de Dolores, Friday of Sorrows, Easter, altars, Virgin Mother Mary, Our Lady of Sorrows, oranges, wheat grass, popsicles, photo challenge , San Miguel de Allende, Mexico, Weekly Prompts Photo Challenge,
Viernes de Dolores, Friday of Sorrows, Easter, altars, Virgin Mother Mary, Our Lady of Sorrows, oranges, wheat grass, popsicles, photo challenge , San Miguel de Allende, Mexico, Weekly Prompts Photo Challenge,
The altars are for Our Lady of Sorrows featuring an image of the Virgin surrounded by white candles, and purple and white fabrics signifying her purity and her grief and mourning.

Always with the altars are displays of bitter oranges representing her tears of sorrow, fennel stands showing the betrayal and abandonment of Jesus by his disciples, and the mother’s joy knowing her son will be resurrected indicated by the inclusion of golden foil.

I kept seeing containers of almost white wheat grass in the displays, and wondered what that represented. A friend enlightened me on her Facebook post with the following explanation:
“There are also pots of pale, almost colorless, wheat grass. It is grown without light to keep it a pale yellow. After it is brought out, it begins to turn bright green over the coming days, signifying the renewal of life and resurrection.” (Thanks CheriRae Wright).

Viernes de Dolores, Friday of Sorrows, Easter, altars, Virgin Mother Mary, Our Lady of Sorrows, oranges, wheat grass, popsicles, photo challenge , San Miguel de Allende, Mexico, Weekly Prompts Photo Challenge,           Viernes de Dolores, Friday of Sorrows, Easter, altars, Virgin Mother Mary, Our Lady of Sorrows, oranges, wheat grass, popsicles, photo challenge , San Miguel de Allende, Mexico, Weekly Prompts Photo Challenge,

As I strolled the streets, another tradition stood out. At most altars popsicles were handed out signifying the Virgin’s tears. Throughout the city the mood was solemn, respectful, and quiet.
It was the beginning of the Easter Holy Week in Mexico.
Viernes de Dolores, Friday of Sorrows, Easter, altars, Virgin Mother Mary, Our Lady of Sorrows, oranges, wheat grass, popsicles, photo challenge , San Miguel de Allende, Mexico, Weekly Prompts Photo Challenge,
My contribution to the photo challenge of Easter from Weekly Prompts. See more at https://weeklyprompts.com/2019/04/13/photo-challenge-easter/

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5 thoughts on “Friday of Sorrows and Popsicles

  1. That tradition, celebration, appeals, speaks to me. Somehow, for reasons I cannot begin to explain, it feels more “right” to me than the often heavy and ponderous traditions in this country. Do you think there’s any truth in that feeling?

    Like

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